FLOODS BEFORE & AFTER

 

 

SELF-HELP ADVICE FOR FLOODS

 

 

BEFORE THE FLOOD

 

General Precautions:

 

·       Flashlight with spare batteries

·       Warm clothing, including waterproof outer garments and footwear

·       Necessary medication

·       Infant care items for your children

·       Blankets

·       Personal toiletries

·       Identification for each member of your household

·       Important personal and family documents

·       Pets should not be taken to an emergency shelter, so have prior arrangements for your pet to go to the home of a friend or a relative that can care for them. Have an emergency kit, which includes additional pet food.

 


Electricity:

 

·       When there is immediate danger of flooding, shut off the main breaker in your home.

 

Heating Equipment:

 

·       Special precautions should be taken to safeguard or minimize damage to electrical, natural gas or propane heating equipment. If there is enough warning time, consult your supplier for instructions or for service on how to proceed.

 

Sand Bag Protection:

In some cases, homes may be protected using sandbags or polyethylene barriers. This approach, however, requires specific instructions that must be followed.

 

SAND BAGGING PHOTO

·       Do not stack sandbags against the outside walls of your house. Water suddenly seeping downward can create pressure, causing walls or floor to buckle. When deep flooding is likely, permitting the floodwaters to flow freely into the basement of your home will help avoid structural damage to the foundation and the house by equalizing the water pressure with the outside of the basement walls and floors.

 


SAND BAG DIKE CROSS SECTIONS DETAIL

 

NOTE:   Bottom Layer of Sand Bags Shall Be Placed With The Longest Dimension Parallel To The Direction Of The Dike and The Next Layer Perpendicular and So On.

 

SAND BAGGING INSTRUCTION DIAGRAM

 


DURING A FLOOD

 

General Information:

 

 

Evacuation:

 

·       Vacate your home when you are advised to do so by local emergency authorities. Ignoring such a warning could jeopardize the safety of your family or those who might eventually have to come to rescue you.

·       Follow the routes specified by the officials. Don’t take shortcuts. A shortcut could take you to a blocked or dangerous area.

·       If time allows, leave a note informing others when you left and where you went. If you have a mailbox. Leave the note there. (Remember to take your emergency survival kit with you.

·       Make arrangements for your pets.

·       If you evacuate or need to go to an emergency reception centre, register with the centre so that you can be contacted and reunited with your loved ones.  Remember to keep your car gas tank at least half-full at all times.

·       Try to keep to the main roads and drive with caution, measuring your speed to road and weather conditions.

·       Avoid passing another vehicle if possible, when weather and road conditions are poor.

 

 


AFTER THE FLOOD

 

General Information:

 

 

Returning Home:

 

 


First Steps in Clean-up:

 

 

 


Structures:

 

 

Heating:

 

·       Do not heat the home to more than 4 degrees Celsius (about 40 degrees Fahrenheit) until all water is removed. A better choice is not to use central air conditioning units and furnaces units until the basement is restored for occupancy since air borne contaminants could be dispersed throughout the house.

·       If you use gasoline-, kerosene- or propane- powered pumps or heaters, buy and install a carbon monoxide sensor. Combustion devices can produce large amounts of lethal carbon monoxide when not in proper working order or improperly ventilated.

·       Replace filters and insulation inside furnaces, water heaters, refrigerators and freezers if they have been wet. It may be cheaper just to replace some equipment. Flooded forced-air heating ducts and return-duct pans should either be cleaned or replaced.

 


Food:

 

 

Water: